Shun Mook Pendulum : A micro-review

Jon2020 -- Sun, 01/27/2013 - 07:48

I just brought home for a trial a most interesting tweak- the Shun Mook Pendulum Stand. I first saw it in a picture posted online by Mr Jonathan Valin. In that picture of his sound system, I got very curious about a stand that looks like a plumbline, placed right in between the speakers. As I thought it was merely a plumbline which Mr Valin would have used to align his speakers, I thought nothing more of it again until.....
Just yesterday, I strolled into  a local audio dealer for Magico speakers and Soulution amps. I was brought into a bigger room further in housing the Magico Q5 and all-Soulution electronics. And there it was...standing right in between the Q5's was that plumbline again. Only this time it wasn't, as the affable store owner informed me that it was the Shun Mook Pendulum Stand(SMPS). He briefly explained that it redirects the flow of "chi" or energy in the room in the proper manner such that the sound improves. So I listened as the SMPS was brought into position or out of the room altogether. The difference was appreciable enough for me to want it to try it at home. No prob, said the affable owner, who brought it to my car just to safely stow it before I drove off. And back home,......
I started by aligning the tip of the pendulum,as instructed, to a height midpoint between the tweeter and midrange drivers, and along a vertical plane flush with the drivers. The first and only problem I encountered was that my speakers, the Vienna Acoustics The Musik, had coincident tweeter and midrange drivers. So I simply aligned the tip of the pendulum to the centre of the drivers and then brought it out of my listening area altogether to a room upstairs. I then listened to a few of my favourite and most familiar tracks. That done, I literally ran upstairs to bring the SMPS down for positioning in between the speakers. I then sat back to listen......
The first thing that struck me was the much lowered noise floor. I can hear more into the mix, wicking up the volume a bit without any strain. Secondly, there was less digital glare, etch and hash. Instruments sounded more fleshed out, gaining in body and density of tone colour. Trumpets sound natural and non-piercing. The soundstage opened up although I felt I had moved a row forward ever so slightly. Female vocals(Patricia Barber in Cafe Blue) sounded more focused and sibilants were banished! The SMPS also added warmth with Stan Getz sounding fuller and more in the room. And the whole system got more musical with the PRAT thingy. I understand that some may opine that the dCS Puccini and U-clock, my front end, may sound a tad dry, lean and analytical. But not any more with the SMPS in place. From this moment on, I just kept beaming from ear to ear. I still am as I write this micro-review. Needless to say, the SMPS will be staying in my home for a long, long time to come. All thanks to JV for unintentionally introducing me to this "plumbline" in the first place.

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