Emerald Physics CS2 speaker

barondla -- Thu, 11/20/2008 - 22:29

Interesting review. Reg always does a nice job. The speakers are listed at 100db efficiency. Why does the Emerald Physics website call for a 200 watt bass amp? My friends horn system could kill you with that kind of power.
Can't wait to hear what others think of this speaker. It does a great job of getting the room out of the sound, but how good does the speaker actually sound?
thanks
barondla

Anonymous -- Fri, 11/21/2008 - 09:58

The efficiency of 100dB is measured at 1kHz which is industry practice. Since the CS2 is bi-amp'd, this efficiency reflects largely that of the compression tweeter. The twin dipole open-baffle 15-inch woofers does take some significant power to get moving due to necessary DSP equalization.

These are superb loudspeakers. Massive soundstage, excellent dynamics, clean highs. Bass is accurately tight with an effortless feel to it... remarkable!

Brody

EasyBigFella -- Mon, 01/19/2009 - 16:33

I was surprised that the CS2 didn't win a Product of the Year Award.

regreene (not verified) -- Wed, 02/18/2009 - 00:42

In a system with an electronic crossover, the measuring of sensitivity is a tricky business because the meaning of it depends on the frequency of measurement.  As already pointed out, the system does not use much power for a given level in the mids(the upper half so to speak), at the standard 1 kHz frequency say.
But the dipole bass section can soak up a good deal of power and needs to to get high levels. To get flat deep  bass from a dipole arrangement, one has to pump some serious power into those lower frequencies at high SPLs. By contrast, the horn loaded top section is high sensitivity. The difference is compensated for in the electronic crossover!
Dipole bass units typically need EQ or something that amounts to that  to be flat , to compensate for dipole rolloff. This can be done electronically, or it can be done with a passive crossover(at some cost of sensitivity overall) or it can be done by using resonance of the woofers to compensate for the dipole rolloff(this was the method in the original Carver Amazings). But somehow, one has to get a lot of woofer motion to get real bass out of a dipole unless it has a really huge baffle!
 

brian -- Wed, 02/18/2009 - 09:30

Dipole bass units typically need EQ or something that amounts to that  to be flat , to compensate for dipole rolloff. This can be done electronically, or it can be done with a passive crossover(at some cost of sensitivity overall) or it can be done by using resonance of the woofers to compensate for the dipole rolloff(this was the method in the original Carver Amazings). But somehow, one has to get a lot of woofer motion to get real bass out of a dipole unless it has a really huge baffle!
 
Inserting electronics such as an EQ unit in the chain isn't good from a purist point of view. Yes, there is dipole cancellation which increases with decreasing frequency and which can be ameliorated by increasing the size of the baffle -- hence your point about the Carver speakers, which as you mention also used the woofer resonance. On a peripherally related topic, I am a proponent of passive EQ by way of room treatment and other methods that don't pollute the signal whenever possible.
 
The point about getting "a lot of woofer motion to get real bass out of a dipole unless it has a really huge baffle" isn't entirely accurate. Increasing woofer motion will tend to boost the upper bass frequencies too much while dipole cancellation continues. In other words, a large bass hump would be introduced, rolling off due to dipole cancellation.

Brian Walsh
Essential Audio  ~  Chicago area ~ 773-809-HIFI (4434)

JPH-22 -- Wed, 02/18/2009 - 13:52

Brian:
So I suppose you think that DSP xovers are more "harmful" than pasive designs. Guess what ? You'd be wrong. Active xovers - esp. the DSP variety - do *less* harm to the signal than a lossy passive sysyem.
.

brian -- Wed, 02/18/2009 - 22:42

You might want to reread my post, JPH. I made no such comments about active vs. passive crossovers. Active analog crossovers are usually superior to passive ones. If you want to insert a digital unit in the chain you're more tolerant than I.

Brian Walsh
Essential Audio  ~  Chicago area ~ 773-809-HIFI (4434)

David McKinney (not verified) -- Fri, 02/27/2009 - 16:57

 Can they approach quads in terms of  transparency, clarity, realism?

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